High-Density Biomass Baling - NE Bioenergy Webinars

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Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Current developments by Forest Concepts are reducing the energy intensity for comminution and drying, as well as new methods to collect and deliver biomass from fields to centralized depots and processing sites. Today, Jim speaks about one of these technologies in particular—high-density biomass baling. High density bales of biomass enable lower-cost transport, storage, and processing of feedstocks for advanced biofuels and bioenergy. Most agricultural balers are designed to make bales that are in the range of 10-12 pounds per cubic foot. Forest Concepts developed engineering data and a prototype baler that can bale switchgrass at twice that density and urban woody biomass from landscapes and infrastructure prunings up to more than 25 pounds per cubic foot. The potential is to reduce the size of bale yards by half, efficiently use rail and long-haul trucking, and achieve other cost savings in the biomass supply chain. The development effort was initially funded by USDA through an SBIR project, and now is supported in-part by US DOE through a BRDI project.

 

These webinars are held (usually) on the second Tuesday of each month at 1PM Eastern time, 12 CT, 11 MT, 10 PT. These online, hour-long presentations are free to the public, and feature important topics related to bioenergy in the northeast. 

Find info at http://www.newbio.psu.edu/Extension/Webinars.asp

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
James Dooley, co-founder and CTO of Forest Concept
Acknowledgments: 

Dr. James H. (Jim) Dooley, co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of Forest Concepts, LLC, located in Auburn, Washington.

The NEWBio Webinar Series is hosted by Sarah Wurzbacher, Penn State University and eXtension Farm Energy community ; held (usually) on the second Tuesday of each month at 1PM Eastern time, 12 CT, 11 MT, 10 PT. These online, hour-long presentations are free to the public, and feature important topics related to bioenergy in the northeast. 

The series is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2012-68005-19703 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

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