Wood Energy

Controlled pollination of willow

Applying pollen to a female willow catkin in a controlled pollination to breed for improved bioenergy willow
Photographer: 
Larry Smart, Cornell University
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Shrub Willow Canopy

Early budbreak of shrub willow allows it to be close to full canopy cover when corn has not been even planted, capturing more radiation and water for growth, and likely preventing excess runoff in spring. Picture taken at Rockview in 4 April 2017.
Photographer: 
Armen Kemanian
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Wood Chips on Conveyor Belt

Biomass fuel feed system at West Branch School District, Morrisdale PA
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Topics: 
Photographer: 
Daniel Ciolkosz, Penn State Extension
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EcoWillow 2.0 - Economic Analysis of Shrub Willow Crops

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Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Presenters:

  • Justin Heavey, Senior Research Support Specialist, Forest & Natural Resources Management, SUNY ESF;
  • Timothy Volk, Senior Research Associate, Forest & Natural Resources Management, SUNY ESF

EcoWillow is a financial analysis tool for willow biomass crops originally developed by SUNY-ESF in 2008 based on 20 years of research and commercial development of the industry. This tool has been downloaded by over 1000 users in 70 countries.

The model has now been comprehensively updated based on the latest data from commercial willow operations in the northeastern U.S and re-released as EcoWillow 2.0. Key updates to the model include

  • a new “fields” module for the inclusion of multiple field locations, transport distances, and headland areas in one project analysis;
  • an updated harvest module based on time-motion studies of the latest harvesting technology developed in partnership with Case New Holland;
  • a more user-friendly design.

This webinar will explain and demonstrate some of the new features in more detail, provide a brief tutorial, model several example crop production scenarios showing the impact of key variables on production costs and profitability, and answer questions about the model and its use. The EcoWillow 2.0 model and several supporting fact sheets are available for download at no cost from http://www.esf.edu/willow/download.htm.

 

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The NEWBio Webinar Series  is hosted by Sarah Wurzbacher, Penn State University and eXtension Farm Energy and held (usually) on the second Tuesday of each month at 1PM Eastern time, 12 CT, 11 MT, 10 PT. These online, hour-long presentations are free to the public, and feature important topics related to bioenergy in the northeast. http://www.newbio.psu.edu/Extension/Webinars.asp

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Justin Heavey & Tim Volk, SUNY ESF
Acknowledgments: 

The NEWBio Webinar Series  is hosted by Sarah Wurzbacher, Penn State University and eXtension Farm Energy and held (usually) on the second Tuesday of each month at 1PM Eastern time, 12 CT, 11 MT, 10 PT. These online, hour-long presentations are free to the public, and feature important topics related to bioenergy in the northeast. http://www.newbio.psu.edu/Extension/Webinars.asp

This NEWBio Webinar Series is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2012-68005-19703 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

Biomass Torrefaction - Production, Technology, and Co-firing Economics

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Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Presented by Tom Causer, President and COO, Terra Green Energy, LLC

Tune in to this webinar archive for an inside look at Terra Green Energy, LLC, and a discussion about its central process: torrefaction--how it works, why the process should be considered, what advantages it introduces to biomass handling, and the key characteristics of torrefied material. The presentation will also address torrefaction feedstocks as well as current challenges and next steps for the industry with a special look at the economics involved when co-firing torrefied biomass thereby displacing a portion of coal at an electrical generation facility.

The NEWBio Webinar Series  is hosted by Sarah Wurzbacher, Penn State University and eXtension Farm Energy and held (usually) on the second Tuesday of each month at 1PM Eastern time, 12 CT, 11 MT, 10 PT. These online, hour-long presentations are free to the public, and feature important topics related to bioenergy in the northeast.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Tom Causer, Terra Green Energy, LLC
Series: 

SUNY-ESF / Shrub Willow

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Thursday, June 18, 2009

SUNY-ESF Research for Sustainable Northeast - Dr. Timothy Volk and SUNY-ESF are at the forefront of research into the growing of shrub willow for use in the creation of liquid transportation fuels such as ethanol and butanol, as burnable chips for heat and energy, and for numerous other bioproducts.

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
SUNY-ESF Willow Project
Acknowledgments: 

Dr. Timothy Volk, SUNY-ESF Willow Project

Short Rotation Woody Crops in the Northeast - Northeast Bioenergy Webinar

No votes yet
Friday, August 26, 2011

This webinar, presented by Tim Volk of SUNY ESF, is part of the Northeast Bioenergy Webinar Series hosted by Penn State Extension.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
SUNY-ESF Willow Project
Acknowledgments: 

Penn State Extension, SUNY-ESF Willow Project

Shrub Willow - Carbon Sequestration & Renewable Energy

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Thursday, November 6, 2014
Levels of carbon sequestration in the root system of the shrub willow have proven to be even greater than previously thought. In this video, Dr. Timothy Volk explains how the shrub willow is both producing a renewable energy resource and also storing carbon dioxide in the ground.
 
Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
SUNY-ESF Willow Project
Acknowledgments: 

Shrub Willow - A Renewable Energy Resource

No votes yet
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Shrub willow is a fast-growing source of woody biomass that's being turned into a renewable energy resource. In Northern New York, about 2,500 tons of willow were harvested and delivered to energy facilities to generate renewable electricity this past year.
Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
SUNY-ESF Willow Project
Acknowledgments: 

Willow Production and Harvesting

No votes yet
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Willow biomass crops are being developed for marginal agricultural land across the Northeast and Midwest U.S. 
 
New single pass cut and chip harvesting systems for willow crops can easily be converted for chopping silage, explaining why willow wood crop production is on the rise. The harvesting system is also being tested in other woody crops like hybrid poplar and eucalyptus.
Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
SUNY-ESF Willow Project
Acknowledgments: 

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