Sustainability Dimensions

Shrub Willow Canopy

Early budbreak of shrub willow allows it to be close to full canopy cover when corn has not been even planted, capturing more radiation and water for growth, and likely preventing excess runoff in spring. Picture taken at Rockview in 4 April 2017.
Photographer: 
Armen Kemanian
Image Upload: 

The CenUSA Legacy

No votes yet
Monday, July 11, 2016

CenUSA Bioenergy, a USDA coordinated agriculture project, was funded to address the challenges of producing biofuel and other products in an environmentally sustainable way that doesn’t interfere with food production or cause adverse land use change.

Over the past five years CenUSA has generated a wealth of information across nine different objectives. This video highlights major accomplishments of each objective in the CenUSA Bioenergy project.

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
Pam Porter, CenUSA, U. of Wisconsin
Acknowledgments: 

This CenUSA video was produced by Pamela Porter, University of Wisconsin Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems; and Don Fleischman, University of Wisconsin Division of Information Technology.

CenUSA Bioenergy is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

Counting Carbon in Bioenergy Systems-Opportunities and Challenges

No votes yet
Tuesday, February 9, 2016

**Apologies for the disparity in volume between the 2 speakers in this webinar recording. Host's voice is quiet, while speaker's is louder - adjust speaker volume accordingly. We will attempt to remedy this in future presentations.**

Presenter: Peter Woodbury, Cornell University

This presentation considers aspects of the carbon cycle critical for bioenergy carbon accounting in general. (The EPA accounting framework specifically will be addressed in the next session.)

In addition to the carbon cycle, we include methane and nitrous oxide because these greenhouse gases (GHGs) are much more potent than carbon dioxide, so small amounts really matter when counting overall GHG emissions. We will review different kinds of biomass feedstocks and bioenergy systems. We will critically examine claims that bioenergy systems are either "carbon-neutral" or that they emit more GHGs than fossil fuel systems. We will discuss important issues that greatly affect GHG accounting, including choice of baseline, scope of the analysis, spatial scales (local to national) and time scales (annual to centuries). Furthermore, we will ask how stakeholders, regulators, and scientists may have different goals and priorities for greenhouse gas accounting rules. We will also examine some examples of existing accounting rules and what they suggest about key opportunities and challenges for accurately accounting for GHG emissions from bioenergy systems.

 

About this webinar series
The Clean Power Plan (CPP) was announced by President Obama and the EPA in August 2015 and provides the first-ever national standards that address carbon pollution from power plants. The final rule takes into account over 4.3 million stakeholder and public comments to ease its implementation, with individual states, tribes, and territories building their own plans to meet mandated carbon reduction goals specific to each planning entity. The proposed state plans outlining how this will be achieved must contain specific steps for each tool in a portfolio of methods used to meet state-level goals: emissions trading, increasing energy efficiency on both supply and demand sides, shifting coal generation to natural gas generation, and/or increasing renewable power generation. That last category leaves room for biomass energy, but stakeholders in the bioeconomy still seek clarification on exactly how biomass could or should fit in to a state plan. This webinar series begins to tackle that question, providing guidance, information from cutting-edge research, and expert perspectives on the role sustainable bioenergy can play in state plans designed to meet CPP requirements. Though the US Supreme Court recently granted a stay on the CPP, many states continue developing their individual plans, and the need for information and clarity regarding this policy remains.

To find out more about this webinar series, visit the CPP Webinar Series Homepage: http://www.newbio.psu.edu/cppwebinar.asp

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Peter Woodbury, Cornell University
Acknowledgments: 

 

Approaches to CPP State Implementation Using Biomass: A Look at Oregon and Washington

No votes yet
Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Presenters: Marcus Kauffman, Biomass Resource Specialist, Oregon Department of Forestry and Chuck Hersey, Forest Health Planner, Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

This presentation offers a glimpse into state-level approaches to the Clean Power Plan where biomass energy is considered both a possible CPP planning tool as well as a key resource in addressing concerns such as the risk of severe wildfires and air quality.  Learn more about these real examples of biomass incorporation into state implementation plans for Oregon and Washington, and hear about how science-based approaches can provide a robust and nuanced picture of biomass in a low-carbon future.

About this webinar series
The Clean Power Plan (CPP) was announced by President Obama and the EPA in August 2015 and provides the first-ever national standards that address carbon pollution from power plants. The final rule takes into account over 4.3 million stakeholder and public comments to ease its implementation, with individual states, tribes, and territories building their own plans to meet mandated carbon reduction goals specific to each planning entity. The proposed state plans outlining how this will be achieved must contain specific steps for each tool in a portfolio of methods used to meet state-level goals: emissions trading, increasing energy efficiency on both supply and demand sides, shifting coal generation to natural gas generation, and/or increasing renewable power generation. That last category leaves room for biomass energy, but stakeholders in the bioeconomy still seek clarification on exactly how biomass could or should fit in to a state plan. This webinar series begins to tackle that question, providing guidance, information from cutting-edge research, and expert perspectives on the role sustainable bioenergy can play in state plans designed to meet CPP requirements. Though the US Supreme Court recently granted a stay on the CPP, many states continue developing their individual plans, and the need for information and clarity regarding this policy remains.

To find out more about this webinar series and look ahead to the full lineup of presentations, visit the CPP Webinar Series Homepage: http://www.newbio.psu.edu/cppwebinar.asp

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Marcus Kauffman, OR Forestry, Chuck Hersey, WA DNR
Acknowledgments: 

 

Tags: 

The Legal Landscape for the Clean Power Plan - CPP

No votes yet
Thursday, August 11, 2016

Presenter: Lara Fowler, Penn State Law, is a chapter author of The Law and Policy of Biofuels

Hosted by: Northeast woody/warm season Biomass Consortium (NEWBio) and the Clean Power Plan (CPP) webinar series

This webinar provides a brief recap of the U.S. Clean Power Plan and what has happened since it was released. The webinar will provide an update on current status and legal challenges, as well as efforts by some states to implement the plan regardless of a stay issued by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Clean Power Plan (CPP) was announced by President Obama and the EPA in early August of 2015 and provides the first-ever national standards that address carbon pollution from power plants. The final rules allow individual states, tribes, and territories to build their own plans to meet mandated carbon reduction goals specific to each planning entity. Those goals are set for the year 2030, providing 15 years for full implementation of emission reduction measures, whose efficacy will be assessed between 2022 and 2029.

The proposed state plans outlining how this will be achieved must be submitted in September of 2016 and contain specific steps for each tool in a portfolio of methods used to meet state-level goals: emissions trading, increasing energy efficiency on both supply and demand sides, shifting coal generation to natural gas generation, and/or increasing renewable power generation. That last category leaves room for biomass energy, but stakeholders in the bioeconomy still seek clarification on exactly how biomass could or should fit in to a state plan.

This webinar series begins to tackle that question, providing guidance, information from cutting-edge research, and expert perspectives on the role sustainable bioenergy can play in state plans designed to meet CPP requirements. Though the US Supreme Court recently granted a stay on the CPP, many states continue developing their individual plans, and the need for information and clarity regarding this policy remains.

Attend the live webinars at https://meeting.psu.edu/bioenergy - sign in as a guest.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Lara Fowler, Penn State University Law
Acknowledgments: 
Tags: 

Penn State Graduate Exhibition-2015 Winner Poster on Bioenergy and Greenhouse gas Emissions

Poster "Global warming and bioenergy: It's about hot spots and hot moments", presented by Debasish Saha, a Penn State graduate student advised by Armen Kemanian and Jason Kaye. This poster won the first place in PSU Graduate Exhibition-2015. http://www.gradschool.psu.edu/exhibition/awards/?year=2015
Photographer: 
Deepkamal Karelia , Penn State
Image Upload: 

An Overview of Switchgrass Diseases

Average: 3 (1 vote)
Monday, December 30, 2013

Because it is a native species requiring minimal management and has a high potential to sequester carbon, switchgrass has been identified as a potential biofuel species. As for any cultivated crop, diseases, insects, and weeds can be major constraints in switchgrass production. To date, not much research has been done on switchgrass diseases. Therefore, little is known about their etiology, epidemiology and impact on yield. This webinar will give an overview of switchgrass diseases. Among the diseases that will be discussed are Panicum mosaic caused by a virus and rust and leaf spots caused by fungi.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Stephen Wegulo, University of Nebraska
Acknowledgments: 

Stephen Wegulo, University of Nebraska 

CenUSA Bioenergy

Series: 

Switchgrass Economics in the North Central Region of the USA (Captioned)

No votes yet
Saturday, March 29, 2014

Dr. Richard Perrin, professor at the University of Nebraska Lincoln Agricultural Economics Department and a CenUSA Bioenergy researcher presents information about switchgrass production costs, potential markets, and market values for switchgrass biomass. Dr. Perrin also discusses potential break even values for corn and switchgrass production on marginal land. This CenUSA webinar was funded by the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Richard Perrin, University of Nebraska Lincoln
Acknowledgments: 

Richard Perrin, University of Nebraska Lincoln Agricultural Economics Department

This CenUSA webinar was funded by the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

CenUSA Entomology Research Examining Insect Populations and Exploring Natural Plant Resistance (Captions)

No votes yet
Sunday, March 30, 2014

In this video Dr. Tiffany Heng-Moss, a professor at the University of Nebraska Lincoln Entomology Department and CenUSA collaborator, discusses research being done as part of the feedstock development efforts at CenUSA. Dr. Heng-Moss explains efforts to survey insect populations, explore natural resistance…

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
Tiffany Heng-Moss, University of Nebraska
Acknowledgments: 

Tiffany Heng-Moss, University of Nebraska

CenUSA Bioenergy

Series: 

Competition for Land Use: Why would the rational producer grow switchgrass for biofuel?

No votes yet
Friday, May 30, 2014

Dr. Keri Jacobs, Co-PD of CenUSA bioenergy Marketing and Economics objective presents this webinar. This presentation considers the current economics of switchgrass production in the Central United States and the fundamental challenges and opportunities that exist. Insight from producers surveys on the market conditions for perennial grasses and implications for market development will be discussed. Program options for dovetailing perennial grass production with existing conservation programs will also be presented.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Keri Jacobs, Co-PD of CenUSA bioenergy
Acknowledgments: 

Dr. Keri Jacobs, Iowa State University, is Co-PD of CenUSA bioenergy Marketing and Economics

The CenUSA Bioenergy project is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

Pages

 
Subscribe to RSS - Sustainability Dimensions