willow

Willow trial on reclaimed strip mine land

Screening scrub willow on reclaimed strip mine land.
Photographer: 
Marvin H. Hall
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EcoWillow 2.0 - Economic Analysis of Shrub Willow Crops

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Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Presenters:

  • Justin Heavey, Senior Research Support Specialist, Forest & Natural Resources Management, SUNY ESF;
  • Timothy Volk, Senior Research Associate, Forest & Natural Resources Management, SUNY ESF

EcoWillow is a financial analysis tool for willow biomass crops originally developed by SUNY-ESF in 2008 based on 20 years of research and commercial development of the industry. This tool has been downloaded by over 1000 users in 70 countries.

The model has now been comprehensively updated based on the latest data from commercial willow operations in the northeastern U.S and re-released as EcoWillow 2.0. Key updates to the model include

  • a new “fields” module for the inclusion of multiple field locations, transport distances, and headland areas in one project analysis;
  • an updated harvest module based on time-motion studies of the latest harvesting technology developed in partnership with Case New Holland;
  • a more user-friendly design.

This webinar will explain and demonstrate some of the new features in more detail, provide a brief tutorial, model several example crop production scenarios showing the impact of key variables on production costs and profitability, and answer questions about the model and its use. The EcoWillow 2.0 model and several supporting fact sheets are available for download at no cost from http://www.esf.edu/willow/download.htm.

 

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The NEWBio Webinar Series  is hosted by Sarah Wurzbacher, Penn State University and eXtension Farm Energy and held (usually) on the second Tuesday of each month at 1PM Eastern time, 12 CT, 11 MT, 10 PT. These online, hour-long presentations are free to the public, and feature important topics related to bioenergy in the northeast. http://www.newbio.psu.edu/Extension/Webinars.asp

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Justin Heavey & Tim Volk, SUNY ESF
Acknowledgments: 

The NEWBio Webinar Series  is hosted by Sarah Wurzbacher, Penn State University and eXtension Farm Energy and held (usually) on the second Tuesday of each month at 1PM Eastern time, 12 CT, 11 MT, 10 PT. These online, hour-long presentations are free to the public, and feature important topics related to bioenergy in the northeast. http://www.newbio.psu.edu/Extension/Webinars.asp

This NEWBio Webinar Series is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2012-68005-19703 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

Short Rotation Woody Crops in the Northeast - Northeast Bioenergy Webinar

No votes yet
Friday, August 26, 2011

This webinar, presented by Tim Volk of SUNY ESF, is part of the Northeast Bioenergy Webinar Series hosted by Penn State Extension.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
SUNY-ESF Willow Project
Acknowledgments: 

Penn State Extension, SUNY-ESF Willow Project

Willow Production and Harvesting

No votes yet
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Willow biomass crops are being developed for marginal agricultural land across the Northeast and Midwest U.S. 
 
New single pass cut and chip harvesting systems for willow crops can easily be converted for chopping silage, explaining why willow wood crop production is on the rise. The harvesting system is also being tested in other woody crops like hybrid poplar and eucalyptus.
Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
SUNY-ESF Willow Project
Acknowledgments: 

Northeast Bioenergy Webinar—Willow Biomass Harvest & Quality

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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

In the past, harvesting short rotation woody crops has been costly and often produced material that was not acceptable to end users. In this month's webinar, we will explore recent developments in the operation of a single-pass cut and chip harvester used in willow biomass operations and how improvements to the harvester have reduced costs. We will also discuss some of the key characteristics of harvested biomass (such as ash content, moisture content, and chip size) and relate the information collected from commercial-scale harvests to new International Standard Organization (ISO) standards for wood chips. This webinar presentation was prepared by Tim Volk and Mark Eisenbies of SUNY-ESF.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Tim Volk and Mark Eisenbies, SUNY-ESF
Acknowledgments: 

Tim Volk and Mark Eisenbies, SUNY-ESF Willow Project

PSUEnergyExtension

Willow biomass yield tial

This photo shows a newly planted biomass yield trial for shrub willow crops. This trial is planted at the SUNY ESF field station in Tully, NY. Biomass yield trials like this are planted across the Northeastern U.S and Southern Canada. Each trials contains twenty to thirty unique willow cultivars that are being evaluated from biomass production, survival, pest and disease resistance and performance on a range of sites and environmental conditions. Data results from these trials are assisting commercial growers to select best and highest yielding varieties and match cultivars to different sites.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
Image Upload: 

Shrub willow biomass crops

This photo shows a willow biomass crop in first growing season after coppice. This cultivar of shrub willow developed by SUNY ESF is known as "fishcreek" and has a distinctive upright form.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
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Willow bioremediation - vegetative landfill cover

This image shows a field of shrub willow biomass crops that is serving as an alternative vegetative landfill cover in Solvay, NY. The willow planting stabilizes the soil, and mitigates water percolation, protecting the local watershed by containing salts that could otherwise leach out. Over 100 acres of this site are currently being remediated with shrub willow, and the woody biomass produced on the site is also being harvested to produce safe and sustainable renewable energy in the local community.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
Image Upload: 

Willow biomass site preperation

Site preparation is an essential step in the willow biomass crop production cycle. One round of proper site preparation ensures high plant density and a successful planting can be harvested up to seven times, every three to four years. Typical site preparation for shrub willow biomass crops including clearing existing vegetation, plowing, disking and smoothing the field.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
Image Upload: 

Willow biomass cut stools during harvest

This image shows cut stools (stumps) of a willow biomass planting during harvest. Willow biomass is harvested in winter while the plants are dormant. The cut stool will resprout with numerous stems and grow rapidly the following spring.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
Image Upload: 

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