shrub willow

Controlled pollination of willow

Applying pollen to a female willow catkin in a controlled pollination to breed for improved bioenergy willow
Photographer: 
Larry Smart, Cornell University
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Shrub Willow Canopy

Early budbreak of shrub willow allows it to be close to full canopy cover when corn has not been even planted, capturing more radiation and water for growth, and likely preventing excess runoff in spring. Picture taken at Rockview in 4 April 2017.
Photographer: 
Armen Kemanian
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SUNY-ESF / Shrub Willow

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Thursday, June 18, 2009

SUNY-ESF Research for Sustainable Northeast - Dr. Timothy Volk and SUNY-ESF are at the forefront of research into the growing of shrub willow for use in the creation of liquid transportation fuels such as ethanol and butanol, as burnable chips for heat and energy, and for numerous other bioproducts.

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
SUNY-ESF Willow Project
Acknowledgments: 

Dr. Timothy Volk, SUNY-ESF Willow Project

Willow biomass yield tial

This photo shows a newly planted biomass yield trial for shrub willow crops. This trial is planted at the SUNY ESF field station in Tully, NY. Biomass yield trials like this are planted across the Northeastern U.S and Southern Canada. Each trials contains twenty to thirty unique willow cultivars that are being evaluated from biomass production, survival, pest and disease resistance and performance on a range of sites and environmental conditions. Data results from these trials are assisting commercial growers to select best and highest yielding varieties and match cultivars to different sites.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
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Shrub willow biomass crops

This photo shows a willow biomass crop in first growing season after coppice. This cultivar of shrub willow developed by SUNY ESF is known as "fishcreek" and has a distinctive upright form.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
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Willow bioremediation - vegetative landfill cover

This image shows a field of shrub willow biomass crops that is serving as an alternative vegetative landfill cover in Solvay, NY. The willow planting stabilizes the soil, and mitigates water percolation, protecting the local watershed by containing salts that could otherwise leach out. Over 100 acres of this site are currently being remediated with shrub willow, and the woody biomass produced on the site is also being harvested to produce safe and sustainable renewable energy in the local community.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
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Willow biomass site preperation

Site preparation is an essential step in the willow biomass crop production cycle. One round of proper site preparation ensures high plant density and a successful planting can be harvested up to seven times, every three to four years. Typical site preparation for shrub willow biomass crops including clearing existing vegetation, plowing, disking and smoothing the field.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
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Willow biomass cut stools during harvest

This image shows cut stools (stumps) of a willow biomass planting during harvest. Willow biomass is harvested in winter while the plants are dormant. The cut stool will resprout with numerous stems and grow rapidly the following spring.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
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Shrub willow cultivar "fish creek"

Numerous cultivars of shrub willow have been developed by SUNY-ESF and Cornell University for biomass energy and alternative applications.
Photographer: 
SUNY ESF
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