safety

Miscanthus harvest

Respirable dust is one safety consideration during biomass harvest
Photographer: 
Doug Schaufler, Penn State
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Hazards of Biomass Production on Marginal Land

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Friday, May 13, 2016

Production of biomass crops such as perennial grasses, willow, or poplar are often considered for so called marginal lands. These may be lands that have difficulty producing a conventional crop because they may have steep terrain, heavy soil, or poor drainage. This production highlights safety concerns that should be taken into consideration if a grower is considering biomass production on these marginal lands.

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
Doug Schaufler, Penn State University
Acknowledgments: 

Penn State University Extension.

This video was produced as part of the Northeast Woody/Warm-season Biomass Consortium. NEWBio is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2012-68005-19703 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

Safety Markings for Wind Measurement Towers (Meteorological Evaluation Towers MET)

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Monday, October 1, 2012

Safety Markings for Wind Measurement Towers (Meteorological Evaluation Towers MET). MET towers are erected to measure wind speed, direction and duration for siting of large wind turbines. Due to their height of less than 200 ft. they are not required to be lighted. The Federal Aviation Administration FAA has issued guidance on how best to mark them to improve safety of low flying aircraft. Marking includes orange and white paint, orange marker balls on the guy wires, and high visibility sleeves.

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
NE Aviation Trades Ass., U of Nebraska-Lincoln Ext
Acknowledgments: 

NATA, Nebraska Aviation Trades Association

University of Nebraska - Lincoln Extension

 

Producer: Mike Kamm

Project Coordinators: F. John Hay, Alixi Brown, Larry Schulze

Voice over: Jeff Wilkerson

Special Thanks to

  • Brian Wilcox, Wilcox Flying Service
  • Nebraska Aviation Trades Association
  • University of Nebraska - Lincoln Extension
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Biodiesel Spontaneous Combustion Trials, University of Idaho

Average: 5 (1 vote)
Monday, December 17, 2012

The first series of trials to replicate spontaneous combustion in a biodiesel facility.  We soaked sawdust with a mixture of biodiesel and a touch of linseed oil.  Within two hours the material began to visibly smolder; within eight hours the material ignited and was consumed by fire.  At the time when a visible flame appeared, the material had reached a core temperature of over 400 °C.   We're studying this phenomenon and how to prevent it at the National Biodiesel Education Program at the University of Idaho.

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
National Biodiesel Education Program, U of Idaho
Topics: 

Biodiesel Production Safety

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Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Making your own Biodiesel fuel is dangerous and involves the use of toxic chemicals. Mistakes can result in fire, loss of property and loss of life. The most serious risks involved in making your own fuel are explained in this video.

See this article on Safety in Small-Scale Biodiesel Production

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
Jon Van Gerpen, University of Idaho Biodiesel Educ
Acknowledgments: 

Jon Van Gerpen, University of Idaho Biodiesel Education Center

Topics: 
 
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