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The CenUSA Legacy

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Monday, July 11, 2016

CenUSA Bioenergy, a USDA coordinated agriculture project, was funded to address the challenges of producing biofuel and other products in an environmentally sustainable way that doesn’t interfere with food production or cause adverse land use change.

Over the past five years CenUSA has generated a wealth of information across nine different objectives. This video highlights major accomplishments of each objective in the CenUSA Bioenergy project.

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
Pam Porter, CenUSA, U. of Wisconsin
Acknowledgments: 

This CenUSA video was produced by Pamela Porter, University of Wisconsin Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems; and Don Fleischman, University of Wisconsin Division of Information Technology.

CenUSA Bioenergy is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

EcoWillow 2.0 - Economic Analysis of Shrub Willow Crops

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Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Presenters:

  • Justin Heavey, Senior Research Support Specialist, Forest & Natural Resources Management, SUNY ESF;
  • Timothy Volk, Senior Research Associate, Forest & Natural Resources Management, SUNY ESF

EcoWillow is a financial analysis tool for willow biomass crops originally developed by SUNY-ESF in 2008 based on 20 years of research and commercial development of the industry. This tool has been downloaded by over 1000 users in 70 countries.

The model has now been comprehensively updated based on the latest data from commercial willow operations in the northeastern U.S and re-released as EcoWillow 2.0. Key updates to the model include

  • a new “fields” module for the inclusion of multiple field locations, transport distances, and headland areas in one project analysis;
  • an updated harvest module based on time-motion studies of the latest harvesting technology developed in partnership with Case New Holland;
  • a more user-friendly design.

This webinar will explain and demonstrate some of the new features in more detail, provide a brief tutorial, model several example crop production scenarios showing the impact of key variables on production costs and profitability, and answer questions about the model and its use. The EcoWillow 2.0 model and several supporting fact sheets are available for download at no cost from http://www.esf.edu/willow/download.htm.

 

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The NEWBio Webinar Series  is hosted by Sarah Wurzbacher, Penn State University and eXtension Farm Energy and held (usually) on the second Tuesday of each month at 1PM Eastern time, 12 CT, 11 MT, 10 PT. These online, hour-long presentations are free to the public, and feature important topics related to bioenergy in the northeast. http://www.newbio.psu.edu/Extension/Webinars.asp

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Justin Heavey & Tim Volk, SUNY ESF
Acknowledgments: 

The NEWBio Webinar Series  is hosted by Sarah Wurzbacher, Penn State University and eXtension Farm Energy and held (usually) on the second Tuesday of each month at 1PM Eastern time, 12 CT, 11 MT, 10 PT. These online, hour-long presentations are free to the public, and feature important topics related to bioenergy in the northeast. http://www.newbio.psu.edu/Extension/Webinars.asp

This NEWBio Webinar Series is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2012-68005-19703 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

Counting Carbon in Bioenergy Systems-Opportunities and Challenges

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Tuesday, February 9, 2016

**Apologies for the disparity in volume between the 2 speakers in this webinar recording. Host's voice is quiet, while speaker's is louder - adjust speaker volume accordingly. We will attempt to remedy this in future presentations.**

Presenter: Peter Woodbury, Cornell University

This presentation considers aspects of the carbon cycle critical for bioenergy carbon accounting in general. (The EPA accounting framework specifically will be addressed in the next session.)

In addition to the carbon cycle, we include methane and nitrous oxide because these greenhouse gases (GHGs) are much more potent than carbon dioxide, so small amounts really matter when counting overall GHG emissions. We will review different kinds of biomass feedstocks and bioenergy systems. We will critically examine claims that bioenergy systems are either "carbon-neutral" or that they emit more GHGs than fossil fuel systems. We will discuss important issues that greatly affect GHG accounting, including choice of baseline, scope of the analysis, spatial scales (local to national) and time scales (annual to centuries). Furthermore, we will ask how stakeholders, regulators, and scientists may have different goals and priorities for greenhouse gas accounting rules. We will also examine some examples of existing accounting rules and what they suggest about key opportunities and challenges for accurately accounting for GHG emissions from bioenergy systems.

 

About this webinar series
The Clean Power Plan (CPP) was announced by President Obama and the EPA in August 2015 and provides the first-ever national standards that address carbon pollution from power plants. The final rule takes into account over 4.3 million stakeholder and public comments to ease its implementation, with individual states, tribes, and territories building their own plans to meet mandated carbon reduction goals specific to each planning entity. The proposed state plans outlining how this will be achieved must contain specific steps for each tool in a portfolio of methods used to meet state-level goals: emissions trading, increasing energy efficiency on both supply and demand sides, shifting coal generation to natural gas generation, and/or increasing renewable power generation. That last category leaves room for biomass energy, but stakeholders in the bioeconomy still seek clarification on exactly how biomass could or should fit in to a state plan. This webinar series begins to tackle that question, providing guidance, information from cutting-edge research, and expert perspectives on the role sustainable bioenergy can play in state plans designed to meet CPP requirements. Though the US Supreme Court recently granted a stay on the CPP, many states continue developing their individual plans, and the need for information and clarity regarding this policy remains.

To find out more about this webinar series, visit the CPP Webinar Series Homepage: http://www.newbio.psu.edu/cppwebinar.asp

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Peter Woodbury, Cornell University
Acknowledgments: 

 

Emissions Accounting for Biomass Under the Clean Power Plan

No votes yet
Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Presenter: Emily McGlynn, Senior Advisor at Forest Trends

This presentation addresses the calculations in the EPA's Biogenic Emissions Accounting Framework, which recently completed a second round of review by the agency's Science Advisory Board.  This will have significant implications once finalized by EPA on how state-level regulators manage the use of bioenergy in their state implementation plans, especially when it comes to defining the term "qualified biomass":  biomass that demonstrates net reductions of CO2 compared to fossil fuels. How will the Supreme Court stay affect the CPP?

 

About this webinar series
The Clean Power Plan (CPP) was announced by President Obama and the EPA in August 2015 and provides the first-ever national standards that address carbon pollution from power plants. The final rule takes into account over 4.3 million stakeholder and public comments to ease its implementation, with individual states, tribes, and territories building their own plans to meet mandated carbon reduction goals specific to each planning entity. The proposed state plans outlining how this will be achieved must contain specific steps for each tool in a portfolio of methods used to meet state-level goals: emissions trading, increasing energy efficiency on both supply and demand sides, shifting coal generation to natural gas generation, and/or increasing renewable power generation. That last category leaves room for biomass energy, but stakeholders in the bioeconomy still seek clarification on exactly how biomass could or should fit in to a state plan. This webinar series begins to tackle that question, providing guidance, information from cutting-edge research, and expert perspectives on the role sustainable bioenergy can play in state plans designed to meet CPP requirements. Though the US Supreme Court recently granted a stay on the CPP, many states continue developing their individual plans, and the need for information and clarity regarding this policy remains.

To find out more about this webinar series, visit the CPP Webinar Series Homepage: http://www.newbio.psu.edu/cppwebinar.asp

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Emily McGlynn, Forest Trends
Acknowledgments: 

 

Incorporating Traditional Forest Product Markets in CPP

No votes yet
Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Presenter: Greg Latta, University of Idaho

This presentation focuses on the issue of baseline choice in evaluating the greenhouse gas (GHG) implications of biomass usage in energy generation. Baseline determination essentially involves some sort of modeling effort to establish a level of GHG emissions and sequestration over time against which an alternative future involving some level of biomass utilization for energy can be evaluated. In forestry, these models typically balance silviculture and harvesting activities with forest manufacturing and product demand through basic market mechanics. We will look across a range of forest market models in use today and discuss how geographic range, sectoral scope, and temporal dynamics can influence baseline and thus simulated response to additional biomass demand.
 

About this webinar series
The Clean Power Plan (CPP) was announced by President Obama and the EPA in August 2015 and provides the first-ever national standards that address carbon pollution from power plants. The final rule takes into account over 4.3 million stakeholder and public comments to ease its implementation, with individual states, tribes, and territories building their own plans to meet mandated carbon reduction goals specific to each planning entity. The proposed state plans outlining how this will be achieved must contain specific steps for each tool in a portfolio of methods used to meet state-level goals: emissions trading, increasing energy efficiency on both supply and demand sides, shifting coal generation to natural gas generation, and/or increasing renewable power generation. That last category leaves room for biomass energy, but stakeholders in the bioeconomy still seek clarification on exactly how biomass could or should fit in to a state plan. This webinar series begins to tackle that question, providing guidance, information from cutting-edge research, and expert perspectives on the role sustainable bioenergy can play in state plans designed to meet CPP requirements. Though the US Supreme Court recently granted a stay on the CPP, many states continue developing their individual plans, and the need for information and clarity regarding this policy remains.

To find out more about this webinar series, visit the CPP Webinar Series Homepage: http://www.newbio.psu.edu/cppwebinar.asp

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Greg Latta, University of Idaho
Acknowledgments: 

 

Bioelectricity under the CPP

No votes yet
Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Presenter: Carrie Annand, Vice President of External Affairs with the Biomass Power Association (BPA)

This presentation focuses on the EPA's Clean Power Plan and various states' plans for including biomass to produce electricity. She will also look at policy factors that are currently unknown and their possible outcomes for the biomass power industry.

 

About this webinar series
The Clean Power Plan (CPP) was announced by President Obama and the EPA in August 2015 and provides the first-ever national standards that address carbon pollution from power plants. The final rule takes into account over 4.3 million stakeholder and public comments to ease its implementation, with individual states, tribes, and territories building their own plans to meet mandated carbon reduction goals specific to each planning entity. The proposed state plans outlining how this will be achieved must contain specific steps for each tool in a portfolio of methods used to meet state-level goals: emissions trading, increasing energy efficiency on both supply and demand sides, shifting coal generation to natural gas generation, and/or increasing renewable power generation. That last category leaves room for biomass energy, but stakeholders in the bioeconomy still seek clarification on exactly how biomass could or should fit in to a state plan. This webinar series begins to tackle that question, providing guidance, information from cutting-edge research, and expert perspectives on the role sustainable bioenergy can play in state plans designed to meet CPP requirements. Though the US Supreme Court recently granted a stay on the CPP, many states continue developing their individual plans, and the need for information and clarity regarding this policy remains.

To find out more about this webinar series, visit the CPP Webinar Series Homepage: http://www.newbio.psu.edu/cppwebinar.asp

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Carrie Annand, Biomass Power Association (BPA)
Acknowledgments: 

 

Biomass Torrefaction - Production, Technology, and Co-firing Economics

No votes yet
Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Presented by Tom Causer, President and COO, Terra Green Energy, LLC

Tune in to this webinar archive for an inside look at Terra Green Energy, LLC, and a discussion about its central process: torrefaction--how it works, why the process should be considered, what advantages it introduces to biomass handling, and the key characteristics of torrefied material. The presentation will also address torrefaction feedstocks as well as current challenges and next steps for the industry with a special look at the economics involved when co-firing torrefied biomass thereby displacing a portion of coal at an electrical generation facility.

The NEWBio Webinar Series  is hosted by Sarah Wurzbacher, Penn State University and eXtension Farm Energy and held (usually) on the second Tuesday of each month at 1PM Eastern time, 12 CT, 11 MT, 10 PT. These online, hour-long presentations are free to the public, and feature important topics related to bioenergy in the northeast.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Tom Causer, Terra Green Energy, LLC
Series: 

Frequency Grid-Vogel

Frequency grid held by Ken Vogel at 2012 CenUSA Bioenergy field day. Developed by Vogel and Master, 2001, to evaluate plant populations immediately after harvest. See how to make & use it on this video: http://farmenergymedia.extension.org/video/how-measure-stand-establishment-using-grid (copy + paste into URL bar)
Photographer: 
F.John Hay, U. of Nebraska-Lincoln
Image Upload: 

David Stock: Switchgrass Production Industry Perspectives

Average: 1 (1 vote)
Wednesday, March 20, 2013

David Stock, President of Stock Seed Farms, provides the industry perspective to attendees of the CenUSA-Extension Switchgrass Establishment Field Day held March 2012, in Mead, Nebraska.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
David Stock / CenUSA
Acknowledgments: 

David Stock, President of Stock Seed Farms

This video was created with the help of  Amy Kohmetscher, and Deana Namuth-Covert; filmed and edited by Ryan Cole at 3 Pillars Media.

The CenUSA Bioenergy project is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

Optimizing Harvest of Perennial Grasses for Biofuel

No votes yet
Thursday, March 7, 2013

CenUSA co-project director and University of Wisconsin professor Kevin Shinners discusses new systems to harvest, handle, store and transport perennial grasses that will be used as biomass feedstocks.

Viewers of this video will also be interested in the CenUSA Fact Sheet "Optimizing Harvest Logistics of Perennial Grasses Used for Biofuel" available at cenusa.iastate.edu/PublicFile/_GetPublicFile?publicFileId=52

 

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
Kevin Shinners, CenUSA, U.Wisconsin
Acknowledgments: 

Video produced by Pam Porter, University of Wisconsin Environmental Resources Center in partnership with the Division of Information Technology.

The CenUSA Bioenergy project is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

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