CenUSA

CenUSA is investigating a regional system for producing fuels from feedstocks derived from potentially high biomass producing herbaceous perennials using the pyrolytic conversion process.  Experts from 8 NCentral US Universities provide resources here.

The CenUSA Legacy

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Monday, July 11, 2016

CenUSA Bioenergy, a USDA coordinated agriculture project, was funded to address the challenges of producing biofuel and other products in an environmentally sustainable way that doesn’t interfere with food production or cause adverse land use change.

Over the past five years CenUSA has generated a wealth of information across nine different objectives. This video highlights major accomplishments of each objective in the CenUSA Bioenergy project.

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
Pam Porter, CenUSA, U. of Wisconsin
Acknowledgments: 

This CenUSA video was produced by Pamela Porter, University of Wisconsin Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems; and Don Fleischman, University of Wisconsin Division of Information Technology.

CenUSA Bioenergy is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

Hazards of Biomass Production on Marginal Land

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Friday, May 13, 2016

Production of biomass crops such as perennial grasses, willow, or poplar are often considered for so called marginal lands. These may be lands that have difficulty producing a conventional crop because they may have steep terrain, heavy soil, or poor drainage. This production highlights safety concerns that should be taken into consideration if a grower is considering biomass production on these marginal lands.

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
Doug Schaufler, Penn State University
Acknowledgments: 

Penn State University Extension.

This video was produced as part of the Northeast Woody/Warm-season Biomass Consortium. NEWBio is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2012-68005-19703 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

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Switchgrass Decision Tool

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Friday, September 25, 2015

Perennial warm season grasses for use as bioenergy crops is still a future possibility, yet current opportunities exist to use perennial warm season grasses for erosion control, grazing, or forages.  The CenUSA bioenergy project funded by USDA NIFA has completed extensive analysis on Switchgrass and other perennials to help foster their utility in the corn belt as bioenergy crops on marginal land.  The enonomic and agronomic analysis has led to the creation of an online tool farmers can use to quantify the costs and benefits of growing switchgrass or other perennial warm season grasses.

Find tool and other resources: Estimated Cost of Establishment and Production of “Liberty” Switchgrass: Perennial Grass Decision Support Tool - Mainul Hoque, Georgeanne Artz, Chad Hart

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Keri Jacobs and Chad Hart, Iowa State University
Acknowledgments: 

Bioenergy Friday Web Seminar Series, hosted by F. John Hay, is sponsored by University of Nebraska Lincoln and eXtension.

CenUSA Bioenergy is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Biochar and Beyond from ARTi

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Friday, October 31, 2014

Presenters Matt Kieffer, Juan Proano and Bernardo del Campo discuss biochar from production to end product and its uses and applications worldwide. Don't miss this presentation, you will be impressed with the enthusiasm and drive of these young bioenergy entrepreneurs.  Their company ARTI can be found online at http://artichar.com/.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Matt Kieffer, Iowa State U.
Acknowledgments: 

http://artichar.com/

Bioenergy Friday Web Seminar Series, hosted by F. John Hay, is sponsored by University of Nebraska Lincoln and eXtension.

CenUSA Bioenergy is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Diversifying Cellulosic Feedstocks with Native Perennial Grasses

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Friday, September 27, 2013

Presented by Dr. DK Lee, University of Illinois, who discusses his research on the role of Prairie Cordgrass and other perennial grass feedstocks in biomass production.

Beneficial bioenergy feedstock should have positive environmental aspects and not compete with food production. Our native prairie grasses can meet both of these requirements. Native prairie grasses as dedicated energy crops have been estimated by agricultural models to have greater potential profits than conventional crops on approximately 16.9 million ha within the United States...

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
DK Lee, University of Illinois
Acknowledgments: 

Bioenergy Friday Web Seminar Series, hosted by F. John Hay, is sponsored by University of Nebraska Lincoln and eXtension.

 

CenUSA Bioenergy is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Aphid Resistance in Switchgrass

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Friday, June 28, 2013

Discovery of aphid resistance in perennial bioenergy feedstock - switchgrass.

Presenter: Kyle Koch, Graduate Student at the University of Nebraska Lincoln

 

 

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
CenUSA Bioenergy
Acknowledgments: 

F. John Hay hosts the Bioenergy Webinar Series, University of Nebraska - Lincoln. http://cropwatch.unl.edu/bioenergy/forums

CenUSA Bioenergy is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Plant Breeding to Improve Yield and Sustainability of Perennial Grasses

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Monday, February 29, 2016

In this video Dr. Michael Casler, CenUSA Project Co-Director and Research Geneticist with USDA Agricultural Research Service, discusses characteristics of different switchgrasses, the perennial grass breeding process, and how plant breeding has been used to improve them for use as a biofuel feedstock as part of the CenUSA Bioenergy project.

Video Type: 
Instructional Video
Author / Producer: 
Michael Casler; Amy Kohmetscher
Acknowledgments: 

Produced by Amy Kohmetscher, The Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute; Pamela Porter, University of Wisconsin Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems; and Don Fleischman, University of Wisconsin Division of Information Technology.

CenUSA Bioenergy is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

Biochar 101: Intro to Biochar

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Monday, January 26, 2015

At the 2014 CenUSA Annual meeting Kurt Spokas presented an introduction to biochar. This is the archived presentation.

 

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Kurt Spokas, USDA-ARS
Acknowledgments: 

Kurt Spokas is a Research Soil Scientist for USDA/ARS in St. Paul Minnesota.

 

The CenUSA Bioenergy project is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

 

Series: 

An Overview of Switchgrass Diseases

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Monday, December 30, 2013

Because it is a native species requiring minimal management and has a high potential to sequester carbon, switchgrass has been identified as a potential biofuel species. As for any cultivated crop, diseases, insects, and weeds can be major constraints in switchgrass production. To date, not much research has been done on switchgrass diseases. Therefore, little is known about their etiology, epidemiology and impact on yield. This webinar will give an overview of switchgrass diseases. Among the diseases that will be discussed are Panicum mosaic caused by a virus and rust and leaf spots caused by fungi.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Stephen Wegulo, University of Nebraska
Acknowledgments: 

Stephen Wegulo, University of Nebraska 

CenUSA Bioenergy

Series: 

Switchgrass Economics in the North Central Region of the USA (Captioned)

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Saturday, March 29, 2014

Dr. Richard Perrin, professor at the University of Nebraska Lincoln Agricultural Economics Department and a CenUSA Bioenergy researcher presents information about switchgrass production costs, potential markets, and market values for switchgrass biomass. Dr. Perrin also discusses potential break even values for corn and switchgrass production on marginal land. This CenUSA webinar was funded by the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Video Type: 
Webinar
Author / Producer: 
Richard Perrin, University of Nebraska Lincoln
Acknowledgments: 

Richard Perrin, University of Nebraska Lincoln Agricultural Economics Department

This CenUSA webinar was funded by the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant no. 2011-68005-30411 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Series: 

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